The Retromantic

22 - Minnesota.

Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall.

—F. Scott Fitzgerald - “The Great Gatsby” (via impetrate)

(Source: girlinlondon, via rabbitnoiz)

And I still wish I hadn’t met you, I was fine until you came along, even though you make me the happiest I know you’ll get bored and leave and that happiness will end.

—Telling myself to stop

(Source: just-adrenaline)

besturlonhere:

jncos:

All you have to do is make .gifs of yourself wearing an ill fitting suit and, like, a fucking bow tie or w/e and it’s like this whole website creams itself

image

(via just-adrenaline)

distant-traveller:

Airglow ripples over Tibet

Why would the sky look like a giant target? Airglow. Following a giant thunderstorm over Bangladesh in late April, giant circular ripples of glowing air appeared over Tibet, China, as pictured above. The unusual pattern is created by atmospheric gravity waves, waves of alternating air pressure that can grow with height as the air thins, in this case about 90 kilometers up. Unlike auroras powered by collisions with energetic charged particles and seen at high latitudes, airglow is due to chemiluminescence, the production of light in a chemical reaction. More typically seen near the horizon, airglow keeps the night sky from ever being completely dark.

Image credit & copyright: Jeff Dai

distant-traveller:

Airglow ripples over Tibet

Why would the sky look like a giant target? Airglow. Following a giant thunderstorm over Bangladesh in late April, giant circular ripples of glowing air appeared over Tibet, China, as pictured above. The unusual pattern is created by atmospheric gravity waves, waves of alternating air pressure that can grow with height as the air thins, in this case about 90 kilometers up. Unlike auroras powered by collisions with energetic charged particles and seen at high latitudes, airglow is due to chemiluminescence, the production of light in a chemical reaction. More typically seen near the horizon, airglow keeps the night sky from ever being completely dark.

Image credit & copyright: Jeff Dai

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)